Blue bells and cockle shells

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Mistress Mary, Quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With Silver Bells, And Cockle Shells,
And so my garden grows.

                                                                                       –Wikipedia

An old rhyme (1744), “Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary,” which this photograph brought to mind.  These pretty posies aren’t silver bells, but they are bluebells, and growing profusely in the spring. Looking forward to photographing wildflowers this year, hopefully in the not too distant future.

Stars in Macro

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Ruby Beach and stars and sea urchins everywhere. My favorite time to visit is in the spring when visitors are few, the environment raw and bracing, and miles and miles of beach to roam. Here, a starfish waiting patiently for the tide to rise and sweep it away. But for now, it simply waits, as do many others along the beach.

Any time is a good time to walk the beach, especially with a camera in hand, and a panorama of beauty in any direction, from cliffs to sea.

Like Stained Glass

wings-4835I used to work a bit in stained glass, mostly suncatchers, not the big leaded window designs one sees in churches and Victorian homes, as much. So details of wings especially intrigue me.

I used to create a lot of butterly suncatchers. Noticing this detail had me in my head, designing pieces of stained glass once again. Maybe some clear glass with copper threading, not necessarily heavier led channels. Delicate, whistful, beautiful.

Note the dusting of pollen on the wings, like golddust. Tiny particles, that from a distance we wouldn’t even notice. But up close, the powdery substance looks like someone had sprinkled yellow bits across the wings. Maybe some fairy dancing by with a basket of golden pollen, sprinkling it, dancing along.

Spring, what a joyful, magical time of  year. Bright colors everywhere. and early spring, that unfolding after a long winter’s sleep. Reawakening. Alive and dancing among the flowers.

Details, details

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I am, you know. All about the details, natural details, in our environment. Like thie pinec cone. Love this design. There is such an intimacy to macro photography, so very up close and personal. Sometimes we get so busy, we miss the detail. We gloss over things, we don’t stop, and really look, admire, attend to, the details in live. We’ve become much too fast of a culture. Nature is rejuvenating. It isn’t always about the big picture, sometimes it’s just a second, a monent, a detail, like this pine cone.

I have this habit of walking and then stopping. Just standing there and waiting, of admiring, of aborbing my surroundings.  It’s that moment of realigning to the the initimacy of details. I love the details.

Spring on my mind

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Seriously, I have spring on my mind. I’m just finishing off a season of mushrooms, and sorting photos from an amazing plethora of fungus and mushrooms this year. But in the meantime I’m now looking forward to the bloom of wildflowers in the spring, and buzzing insects, and especially to summer dragonflies and butterflies and bees. I think I’m ready.

 

Macro and Bees

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When I first got the Tamron 90mm lens of course it was time to play. and spend lots of time learning. I have several tripods. One is a heavy duty tripod for when I’m using the 100-650 lens, and then at the oppose end of the spectrum, I have a lightweight tripod that folds up neatly to fit into my camera bag. I usually carry this one with me so I have something to work with, and it can hold my 18-400mm lens in a pinch as long as I’m steadying the frame. But mostly, I use the lightweight for macro work and getting close to the ground, or as in this instance, close to the bee as its collecting pollen.

Found a great buy on a trip last spring. Five dollars and I have found it to be about the best tripod that can handle from the heavy lens to the lightweight, and not an onorously heavy tripod. Older, but by golly it gets the job done.  It isn’t about the cost of the tripod, in the end, it’s about what works for you as the photographer. This I have found to be true.

Intimacy and Snow

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There is an intimacy with nature that I truly enjoy with photography. I do like to do some landscape stuff as well, but I am about the detail, the things we miss when we move too quickly through this world. I think I’m more about my impressions of nature, the dreamline quality of removing ourselves from civilization, form city pavements and roadways and experience the sublime peace of walking through a forest, or by the side of a lake or river.

In winter, there’s a certain  quality of stillness in the morning, a muffled sense of solitude when snow blankets the ground. There’s a subtlety to winter in nature that I trully embrace.

Rock 2019 with new goals, new adventures…

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A new year is here. Fresh year, new chapter, so many adventures to take. Time to begin. We don’t know what the year will bring, but it’s up to us how we move forward, what mood we move forward with, and deciding what goals we want to achieve, both short-term and long term.

One of my goals is to visit 52 different parks this year, and I know that’s a doable goal. That’s other part of goal-setting is making goals that have a chance to succeed.  That doesn’t mean they should all be easy, we do need to reach somewhat. But a mix of goals is always good and it helps to motivate and be able to move on to the next goal we have set.

Mr. Squirrel just walked across the fence in front of my window. It’s a sunny day and I expect he’s other gathering some stores to carry him through. Planning is an important of making progress for humans as well. And be it photography or writing, having a list of goals helps to keep one rooted to progress. It helps to redefine periodically if we have that written list.

This weekend I think I’ll plan those 52 park adventures, and by year end I’ll see how well I’ve done. I’ll revisit my list every three months or so to keep me grounded on moving forward, but whether I hit 10 or 52, it’s all about progress. Do you have your goals set for 2019?

Happy New Year, everyone!